By Nick Mosher

The events in Ferguson, Missouri didn’t really hit home for me at first. It seemed so far away. But the protests and quick response from the media following the fatal shooting woke me up. From there, I became concerned and tried to compile the facts of the story, but even that has been difficult to do in the flurry of media  and with the police department keeping the investigation close to the vest. Until more of those facts are out, I cannot truly say how I feel about the shooting of Mike Brown except that it was too soon for him to leave our planet. No matter what the outcome, I am a firm believer in the goodness of people and that no one should be forced to leave in such a brutal way.


But this event has really exposed a bigger issue to the country, one I was not really thinking about–inequality. I admit, I thought we had come a lot farther in eliminating inequality in our country.  But the events in Ferguson have really shown me that we have a lot more to do. It’s not an easy task, but as I tell many of my scholars at BVP, a lot of the things in life worth doing are hard.


I think that schools like BVP are taking the right steps to end inequality in our country. Being a school that is intentionally diverse is vital to showing our children that we are all capable of amazing accomplishments. The sooner that each generation realizes that, the sooner we will be able to eliminate inequality.


For me personally, I was not raised in a diverse environment. Everyone looked like me and acted like me, and we all shared a similar background.  As such, I did not have to face inequality every day.  Realizing this now as an adult, however, I have worked to rectify that by trying to befriend people who come from different backgrounds and cultures than my own. But I know that I missed a vital opportunity to learn and share across lines of difference while I was growing up. BVP gives its scholars that opportunity to see the world through varying lenses.


The mission of BVP to put all scholars on a path to success in college and the world beyond means that they are pushing all scholars, no matter their race or background, to be successful. Every successful scholar can be a role model for those coming up and help build up their communities to end the inequality that may be there. As a teacher, I know that this is hard to accomplish, but BVP’s mission drives me every day to put in 100% for my scholars. Every day I put in 100%, my scholars get closer to being that role model, that positive difference maker that I know they can be.


About Nick Mosher:
Mr. Mosher went to school at Salve Regina University in Newport, RI in 2009 to fufill his dream of becoming a teacher. Immediately out of college, Mr. Mosher knew he wanted to work at BVP after learning about how much they did for their scholars. Then he began working at BVP last year at the middle school in the sixth grade. He enjoyed his time working with the sixth grade, but really wanted to return to working with younger students. Mr. Mosher is joining the team and family at Elementary School 2 beginning this school year. He is excited to begin working with the scholars at ES2!